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Freedom Friday: 75 iconic photos that have defined the 21st century so far.

madeinafreeworld:

image

A protestor giving flowers to the anti-riot policemen in Kiev, Ukraine during the Orange Revolution in 2004.

See the other 74 photos here!

Not changed enough


About 3 months ago photographer Dan Tobin Smith set up a website to ask the public to donate kipple: junk that was lying around their house. “It’s time to free yourself of the pointless or unused objects in your life,” read the plea. “Give them a purpose as part of Dan Tobin Smith’s installation for the London Design Festival 2014.”
via This is Colossal 


I could name a colossal piece with the junk lying around the flat!!

About 3 months ago photographer Dan Tobin Smith set up a website to ask the public to donate kipple: junk that was lying around their house. “It’s time to free yourself of the pointless or unused objects in your life,” read the plea. “Give them a purpose as part of Dan Tobin Smith’s installation for the London Design Festival 2014.”

via This is Colossal 

I could name a colossal piece with the junk lying around the flat!!

(Source: nprfreshair)

"This true story has obviously been sweetened a bit, and while Pride has plenty of harsh notes—disappointments, rejections, rabidly homophobic antagonists, even brutality—the vibe is upbeat. It works on you, this movie. Nearly every line makes you cackle or puts a lump in your throat or both—and it’s not easy to cackle with a lump in your throat. You make a lot of weird tubercular sounds."

David Edelstein, film critic 

The new film Pride gathers a group of actors, among them Bill Nighy and The Wire’s Dominic West, to tell the story of a 1980’s British coal miner’s strike unexpectedly joined by a coalition of gay men and women. 

(via nprfreshair)

Love this story

Still that bad? Heartbreaking

(Source: justice4mikebrown)

cemeterydreamscapes:

Watch the trailer for M.I.A.’s controversial unreleased documentary before it’s pulled from the internet again. Reblog the shit out of this.

(via peeahhh)

streetetiquette:

@masterwilliams lamping • @joahspearman #vscocam #experiencelocal

Gorgeous man

streetetiquette:

@masterwilliams lamping • @joahspearman #vscocam #experiencelocal

Gorgeous man

Street art in Chhobi’r Haat

kateoplis:

The Woman Who Walked 10,000 Miles (No Exaggeration) in Three Years
“A hundred years ago, when Robert Falcon Scott set out for Antarctica on his Terra Nova expedition, his two primary goals were scientific discovery and reaching the geographic South Pole. Arguably, though, Scott was really chasing what contemporary observers call a sufferfest. He set himself up for trouble: Scott brought Manchurian and Siberian ponies that quickly fell through the snow and ice; he planned, in part, for his crew to “man-haul,” meaning that the men would pull sleds full of gear, instead of relying on dogs. Even when Scott’s men faltered, they continued collecting specimens, including rocks. The expedition ended terribly; everybody who made the push to the pole died. Miserable, starving and frostbitten, one of Scott’s last four men killed himself by walking into a blizzard without even bothering to put on his boots.”
“But then there’s Sarah Marquis, who perhaps should be seen as an explorer like Scott, born in the wrong age. She is 42 and Swiss, and has spent three of the past four years walking about 10,000 miles by herself, from Siberia through the Gobi Desert, China, Laos and Thailand, then taking a cargo boat to Brisbane, Australia, and walking across that continent. Along the way, like Scott, she has starved, she has frozen, she has (wo)man-hauled. She has pushed herself at great physical cost to places she wanted to love but ended up feeling, as Scott wrote of the South Pole in his journal: “Great God! This is an awful place.” Despite planning a ludicrous trip, and dying on it, Scott became beloved and, somewhat improbably, hugely respected. Marquis, meanwhile, can be confounding. “You tell people what you’re doing, and they say, ‘You’re crazy,’ ” Marquis told me. “It’s never: ‘Cool project, Sarah! Go for it.’ ” Perhaps this is because the territory Marquis explores is really internal — the nature of fear, the limits of stamina and self-reliance and the meaning of traveling in nature as a female human animal, alone.”
Read on.

Wow

kateoplis:

The Woman Who Walked 10,000 Miles (No Exaggeration) in Three Years

A hundred years ago, when Robert Falcon Scott set out for Antarctica on his Terra Nova expedition, his two primary goals were scientific discovery and reaching the geographic South Pole. Arguably, though, Scott was really chasing what contemporary observers call a sufferfest. He set himself up for trouble: Scott brought Manchurian and Siberian ponies that quickly fell through the snow and ice; he planned, in part, for his crew to “man-haul,” meaning that the men would pull sleds full of gear, instead of relying on dogs. Even when Scott’s men faltered, they continued collecting specimens, including rocks. The expedition ended terribly; everybody who made the push to the pole died. Miserable, starving and frostbitten, one of Scott’s last four men killed himself by walking into a blizzard without even bothering to put on his boots.”

But then there’s Sarah Marquis, who perhaps should be seen as an explorer like Scott, born in the wrong age. She is 42 and Swiss, and has spent three of the past four years walking about 10,000 miles by herself, from Siberia through the Gobi Desert, China, Laos and Thailand, then taking a cargo boat to Brisbane, Australia, and walking across that continent. Along the way, like Scott, she has starved, she has frozen, she has (wo)man-hauled. She has pushed herself at great physical cost to places she wanted to love but ended up feeling, as Scott wrote of the South Pole in his journal: “Great God! This is an awful place.” Despite planning a ludicrous trip, and dying on it, Scott became beloved and, somewhat improbably, hugely respected. Marquis, meanwhile, can be confounding. “You tell people what you’re doing, and they say, ‘You’re crazy,’ ” Marquis told me. “It’s never: ‘Cool project, Sarah! Go for it.’ ” Perhaps this is because the territory Marquis explores is really internal — the nature of fear, the limits of stamina and self-reliance and the meaning of traveling in nature as a female human animal, alone.”

Read on.

Wow

thewescoast:

spriit:

lemonyfricket:

internet-legend:

thatfunnygarrettguy:

Jesus Christ what just happened.

look at different people each time tho

#is this problem sleuth

sHE THREW A BABY

I’ve been watching his for the past 5 minutes


That’s funny

thewescoast:

spriit:

lemonyfricket:

internet-legend:

thatfunnygarrettguy:

Jesus Christ what just happened.

look at different people each time tho

sHE THREW A BABY

I’ve been watching his for the past 5 minutes

That’s funny

(Source: raulpax, via 2-ee)

hitrecordjoe:

We’re making art re: #Feminism + more for our TV show. Check out this video for all kinds of HITRECORD ON TV projects you can work on w/ us.
WATCH HERE

Cool

hitrecordjoe:

We’re making art re: #Feminism + more for our TV show. Check out this video for all kinds of HITRECORD ON TV projects you can work on w/ us.

WATCH HERE

Cool

theparisreview:

“The novel’s takeaway, for me, is a don’t-look-back realization most teenagers have, at some point, wherein they recognize that everything they thought was the best—or the most important, or the worst thing ever—was actually mundane, trivial. That’s a sobering feeling, even when it comes to the vagaries of young love, the ache that feels like a hole in the stomach.”
J. C. Gabel on remembering Alain-Fournier’s Le Grand Meaulnes on the centenary of its author’s death.

theparisreview:

“The novel’s takeaway, for me, is a don’t-look-back realization most teenagers have, at some point, wherein they recognize that everything they thought was the best—or the most important, or the worst thing ever—was actually mundane, trivial. That’s a sobering feeling, even when it comes to the vagaries of young love, the ache that feels like a hole in the stomach.”

J. C. Gabel on remembering Alain-Fournier’s Le Grand Meaulnes on the centenary of its author’s death.

Storm clouds, thunder & rain & a golden sky

Rickshaw ride in the rain

vicemag:

Hobbes Ginseberg is a 20-year-old Los Angeles-based photographer who doesn’t want to make a big deal about their gender but prefers the pronouns she or they. They moved to Seattle after completing high school, and a year and a half after that followed their dreams to Hollywood. We met when I was in LA visiting artists on official VICE business last month, and I was immediately struck by Hobbes’s alert, inquisitive presence. After having known each other for no more than five minutes, we decided we should work together on an issue of MATTEmagazine to be released at the New York Art Book Fair this week at MoMA PS1, and went to the roof of the hotel, where I made the above cover portrait. I only had four frames left on my roll of film, but somehow each picture turned out to be interesting. Hobbes is someone who uses their self-image as their art, so this wasn’t actually that surprising. A mix of politically engaged self-portraiture in photography in the tradition of Catherine Opie, Cobain-scented soft grunge internet phenomena, and something indescribably glamourous and completely their own, Hobbes’s Selfies made me want to find out more about them.

VICE: How did you start taking pictures?
Hobbes Ginsberg:
 I used to do a lot of street photography. Taking pictures started for me on a trip to New York in the summer of 2010 and I had this “professional” point-and-shoot camera that I borrowed from a friend. I started taking photos of all the people I saw on the street who interested me visually. I had a vague idea of what street photography was at that point from deviantART, and on that trip I saw an exhibition by Henri Cartier-Bresson and some other old guy I dont remember. It took off from there. I did a lot of street work in Nicaragua.

When did you start taking pictures of yourself?
About two years ago I stopped shooting outside for a long time, and felt a need to turn inward so I just took a ton of selfies. It was easier for me to try new things that way. I borrowed some lights from the yearbook team at my school, and thats how I first got into studio work.

What kind of role does taking pictures of yourself play in your life?
In terms of my oeuvre, most people care the most about my selfies, and its what cemented my current aesthetic. It also the work I make that is the most cathartic for me. I get into these moods where I feel really shitty, and the way to fix it is to take photos.

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